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Education: TC A

To understand the value of our Triple Confirmation A Indicator, we need to learn a few core concepts of Trading, especially in the Crypto Space. Let's go!
WORK IN PROGRESS

Fibonacci Levels

Fibonacci levels, derived from the Fibonacci sequence, are horizontal lines on a price chart that indicate potential support and resistance points. In cryptocurrency trading, traders use these levels to predict potential price retracement or reversal areas. The most commonly used Fibonacci retracement levels are 23.6%, 38.2%, 50%, 61.8%, and 100%. Traders observe these levels to identify entry and exit points or to set stop-loss and take-profit targets. Given the volatile nature of cryptocurrencies, combining Fibonacci levels with other technical indicators can enhance decision-making in trades.
What are Fibonacci levels?
Fibonacci levels are a popular tool used in technical analysis in finance. They're based on the Fibonacci sequence, a series of numbers in which each number is the sum of the two preceding ones, usually starting with 0 and 1. That is, 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, and so on.
When applied in technical analysis, Fibonacci levels are used to predict potential support and resistance levels in the market. This is based on the observation that markets often retrace a predictable portion of a move, and then continue in the original direction.
The key Fibonacci ratios used in financial markets are 23.6%, 38.2%, 50%, 61.8%, and 100%. These are derived from mathematical relationships between numbers in the Fibonacci sequence.
For instance, if you take any number in the sequence and divide it by the next number, you'll get approximately 0.618 (61.8%). If you divide it by the number two places to the right, you'll get approximately 0.382 (38.2%). And if you divide it by the number three places to the right, you'll get approximately 0.236 (23.6%).
In practice, a trader or investor who uses Fibonacci levels would take a high and a low on a price chart, and then apply these ratios to find potential levels of support or resistance. For example, if a stock rose from $10 to $20, and then started to pull back, the trader might look for it to find support around $16.18 (the 61.8% retracement), $15 (the 50% retracement), or $13.82 (the 38.2% retracement).
It's important to note that while Fibonacci levels can be a useful tool in technical analysis, they're not foolproof and should be used in conjunction with other indicators and methods.
Applying Fibonacci Levels in Cryptocurrency Trading
Let's consider the case of Bitcoin (BTC) for our example. Please note that the principles of applying Fibonacci levels remain the same, regardless of whether you're trading stocks, commodities, or cryptocurrencies.
Suppose BTC was trading at $10,000 and then experienced a bull run, hitting a high of $20,000. After reaching this peak, BTC starts to pull back. You, as a trader, want to find potential support levels where the price might start to rise again. To do this, you apply Fibonacci retracement levels.
To calculate these levels, you'd subtract the low price ($10,000) from the high price ($20,000) to get the total increase ($10,000), and then multiply this by each of the key Fibonacci ratios.
Here's what those levels would look like:
  • The 23.6% retracement level is $12,360. This is calculated as $20,000 - ($10,000 * 23.6%).
  • The 38.2% retracement level is $13,820. This is calculated as $20,000 - ($10,000 * 38.2%).
  • The 50% retracement level is $15,000. This is calculated as $20,000 - ($10,000 * 50%).
  • The 61.8% retracement level is $16,180. This is calculated as $20,000 - ($10,000 * 61.8%).
So, if BTC started to pull back from its $20,000 high, you might look for it to find support at these levels.
Remember, Fibonacci levels are not guaranteed to hold. They are merely tools used by traders to predict potential support and resistance levels. They should be used in conjunction with other forms of analysis and indicators.

Moving Averages

In the dynamic world of cryptocurrency trading, moving averages (MAs) stand as essential tools to discern underlying trends amidst the market's inherent volatility. By averaging out price data over specific intervals, MAs present a smoothed line that helps traders gauge the general direction of a crypto asset's price movement. Two prevalent types, the Simple Moving Average (SMA) and the Exponential Moving Average (EMA), are frequently used; with the EMA giving higher weightage to recent prices, it's often favored for its quicker response to price shifts. Traders often watch for crossovers—instances when a shorter-period MA crosses a longer-period one—as potential buy or sell signals. Especially in crypto markets, where swift price changes are commonplace, MAs serve as pivotal reference points for support, resistance, and trend analysis.
Exponential Moving Average (EMA)
EMA stands for Exponential Moving Average. It's a type of moving average that places a greater weight and significance on the most recent data points.
Like all moving averages, the exponential moving average is used to smooth out price data to help traders identify trends over a specific period. However, because the EMA emphasizes more recent data, it's more responsive to recent price changes compared to the Simple Moving Average (SMA), which assigns equal weight to all periods in the specified range.
The EMA is calculated by adding a certain percentage of the current closing price to the previous day's EMA. The weighting for each older data point decreases exponentially, giving much more importance to recent observations while still not discarding older observations entirely.
EMAs can be used in technical analysis for a variety of purposes, including:
  1. 1.
    Identifying trend direction: If the EMA is rising, the trend is up. If it's falling, the trend is down.
  2. 2.
    Providing potential buy and sell signals: Some traders believe that when a shorter-period EMA crosses above a longer-period EMA (e.g., the 9-day EMA crosses above the 30-day EMA), it's a bullish signal to buy. Conversely, when a shorter-period EMA crosses below a longer-period EMA, it's a bearish signal to sell.
  3. 3.
    Identifying support and resistance levels: Price levels at which the asset has a hard time moving beyond can often be identified by EMAs, particularly those of longer periods.
Remember, while EMAs are a useful tool in technical analysis, they should not be used in isolation. They're most effective when used in conjunction with other indicators and methods.
Hull Moving Average (HMA)
HMA stands for Hull Moving Average. It's a type of moving average developed by Alan Hull to address the lag issue inherent in traditional moving averages while also improving smoothness.
The HMA uses weighted moving averages and the square root of the period to calculate its value. This results in a moving average line that stays closer to the price line than other moving averages, which means it provides a more accurate and quicker signal.
The Hull Moving Average is calculated as follows:
  1. 1.
    Calculate a Weighted Moving Average with period sqrt(n) and multiply it by 2. Let's call it WMA1.
  2. 2.
    Calculate a Weighted Moving Average for the period n and subtract WMA1 from it. Let's call this WMA2.
  3. 3.
    Calculate a Weighted Moving Average with period sqrt(n) based on WMA2.
Here's how you might use the HMA in trading:
  1. 1.
    Trend Identification: If the HMA is rising, the trend is up. If it's falling, the trend is down.
  2. 2.
    Buy/Sell Signals: Some traders use crossovers as potential buy and sell signals. For example, if the price crosses above the HMA, it may be a bullish signal to buy. Conversely, if the price crosses below the HMA, it may be a bearish signal to sell.
Like other technical analysis tools, the HMA should be used in conjunction with other indicators and methods. It's also important to remember that no technical analysis tool is foolproof or guarantees success.
Simple Moving Average (SMA)
SMA stands for Simple Moving Average, a type of moving average that calculates the average price of an asset over a specific number of periods. It's called a "moving" average because as new periods (such as days, weeks, or months) come into calculation, the oldest ones are dropped, hence the average "moves" over time.
The calculation of an SMA is straightforward: it's simply the sum of the prices for a given number of periods, divided by that number of periods. For instance, a 10-day SMA would add up the closing prices for the last 10 days and then divide by 10.
Here's how you might use the SMA in trading:
  1. 1.
    Trend Identification: If the SMA is rising, the trend is up. If it's falling, the trend is down. For example, if the 50-day SMA is above the 200-day SMA, the overall trend is considered bullish. Conversely, if the 50-day SMA is below the 200-day SMA, the trend is bearish.
  2. 2.
    Support and Resistance: Prices often respect the SMA as a support or resistance line. When the price is above the SMA, it may act as a support line, and when the price is below it, the SMA may act as resistance.
  3. 3.
    Buy/Sell Signals: When a shorter-period SMA crosses above a longer-period SMA (for instance, the 50-day SMA crossing above the 200-day SMA), it's often seen as a bullish (buy) signal. Conversely, when a shorter-period SMA crosses below a longer-period SMA, it's seen as a bearish (sell) signal.
Keep in mind that the SMA is a lagging indicator because it's based on past prices. While it can help identify the direction of the trend, it's less responsive to new price changes compared to other types of moving averages like the Exponential Moving Average (EMA) or the Hull Moving Average (HMA). As with all technical analysis tools, the SMA should be used in conjunction with other indicators and methods.
Weighted Moving Average (WMA)
WMA stands for Weighted Moving Average, a type of moving average that assigns a greater weight to more recent data points. The WMA is calculated by multiplying each data point by a weight, summing them up, and then dividing by the sum of the weights.
In the case of a WMA, the weight given to each data point usually depends on its age. The most recent price will receive the highest weight, the second most recent price will receive the second highest weight, and so on. The weighting decreases all the way down to the first or oldest price in the period.
Here's how you might use the WMA in trading:
  1. 1.
    Trend Identification: If the WMA is rising, the trend is up. If it's falling, the trend is down.
  2. 2.
    Buy/Sell Signals: Similar to other moving averages, when a shorter-period WMA crosses above a longer-period WMA, it might be seen as a bullish signal to buy. Conversely, when a shorter-period WMA crosses below a longer-period WMA, it might be seen as a bearish signal to sell.
  3. 3.
    Support and Resistance: Prices often respect the WMA as a support or resistance line. When the price is above the WMA, it may act as a support line, and when the price is below it, the WMA may act as resistance.
Because the WMA gives more weight to recent prices, it's more responsive to price changes than the Simple Moving Average (SMA). However, it's also more likely to react to short-term price fluctuations, which could result in more false signals. Like all technical analysis tools, the WMA should be used in conjunction with other indicators and methods.
Arnaud Legoux Moving Average (ALMA)
ALMA stands for Arnaud Legoux Moving Average, a type of moving average developed by Arnaud Legoux and Dimitris Kouzis-Loukas. The ALMA is designed to provide a smooth, accurate representation of the market, while also eliminating lag which is a common issue with many other moving averages.
The ALMA works by applying more weight to the center of the data window, and less weight to the newest and oldest data points in the window. This weighting is applied using a special gaussian distribution formula, which helps to eliminate noise and provide a smoother line than other moving averages.
Here's how you might use the ALMA in trading:
  1. 1.
    Trend Identification: If the ALMA is rising, the trend is up. If it's falling, the trend is down.
  2. 2.
    Buy/Sell Signals: Similar to other moving averages, when a shorter-period ALMA crosses above a longer-period ALMA, it might be seen as a bullish signal to buy. Conversely, when a shorter-period ALMA crosses below a longer-period ALMA, it might be seen as a bearish signal to sell.
  3. 3.
    Support and Resistance: Prices often respect the ALMA as a support or resistance line. When the price is above the ALMA, it may act as a support line, and when the price is below it, the ALMA may act as resistance.
Like all moving averages, the ALMA is best used in conjunction with other forms of technical analysis, and traders should take into account other market factors when making trading decisions.
Volume Weighted Moving Average (VWMA)
VWMA stands for Volume Weighted Moving Average. It's a type of moving average that gives more weight to price points with higher trading volume.
The VWMA is similar to a simple moving average, but instead of each closing price having the same weight, the VWMA assigns more weight to days with higher volume. The rationale behind this is that price points with higher trading volume are more significant because they represent a larger number of traded shares.
The formula to calculate the VWMA is as follows:
VWMA = [ (P1 * V1) + (P2 * V2) + ... + (Pn * Vn) ] / (V1 + V2 + ... + Vn)
Where:
  • P1, P2, ..., Pn are the prices in the period considered
  • V1, V2, ..., Vn are the volumes in the period considered
Here's how you might use the VWMA in trading:
  1. 1.
    Trend Identification: If the VWMA is rising, the trend is up. If it's falling, the trend is down.
  2. 2.
    Buy/Sell Signals: Traders may look for the VWMA to cross above a simple moving average (SMA) as a buy signal, or cross below the SMA as a sell signal. This is based on the idea that when volume is factored in, it can provide a more accurate reflection of the strength of the trend.
  3. 3.
    Confirming Breakouts: The VWMA can be used to confirm breakouts by looking at the volume. If the price breaks out above a resistance level with a corresponding high-volume day (and thus a higher VWMA), it may be a stronger indication of a valid breakout.
As with all technical analysis tools, the VWMA should be used in conjunction with other indicators and methods. It's also important to remember that while volume can provide additional insight into market dynamics, it doesn't always correspond with price movement.

Divergence Hunter

In the realm of cryptocurrency trading, divergences are potent indicators hinting at potential trend reversals. Essentially, a divergence occurs when the price of a cryptocurrency and a technical indicator, such as the Relative Strength Index (RSI) or Moving Average Convergence Divergence (MACD), move in opposite directions. There are two main types: bullish and bearish. A bullish divergence arises when the crypto asset's price forms a new low, while the technical indicator forms a higher low, suggesting potential upward momentum. Conversely, a bearish divergence is observed when the price creates a new high, but the indicator peaks at a lower high, indicating a possible downturn. Crypto traders value divergences for their ability to provide early warning signs, helping them to strategically position themselves ahead of significant market shifts. However, as with all technical indicators, it's crucial to use divergences in tandem with other tools to enhance decision accuracy.
What are Divergences?
In technical analysis, a divergence occurs when the price of an asset is moving in the opposite direction of a technical indicator. Divergences can be an important signal of a potential reversal in price. They are commonly used with momentum indicators like the Relative Strength Index (RSI), Moving Average Convergence Divergence (MACD), and Stochastic Oscillator.
There are two main types of divergences:
  1. 1.
    Bullish Divergence: This occurs when the price of an asset is making lower lows, but the indicator is making higher lows. This suggests that the downward trend is losing momentum and that there may be a potential upward reversal in price.
  2. 2.
    Bearish Divergence: This occurs when the price of an asset is making higher highs, but the indicator is making lower highs. This suggests that the upward trend is losing momentum and that there may be a potential downward reversal in price.
Here's how you might use divergences in trading:
  1. 1.
    Identify potential reversals: If you notice a divergence between the price and an indicator, it could be a sign that the current trend is weakening and might soon reverse. This could be a good time to exit a trend-following trade or consider a reversal trade.
  2. 2.
    Confirm other signals: Divergences can be used to confirm signals from other technical analysis methods. For example, if you see a bearish divergence at the same time as a resistance level is reached, it could provide additional confirmation of a potential sell signal.
Remember, like all technical analysis tools, divergences are not foolproof and can sometimes give false signals. They're most effective when used in conjunction with other forms of technical analysis.
What are regular Divergences?
Regular divergences, also known as classic divergences, are used as potential signs for reversals in the market trend. They occur when the price of an asset and a technical indicator move in opposite directions. They can be either bullish or bearish:
  1. 1.
    Regular Bullish Divergence: This occurs when the price of an asset is making lower lows, but the oscillator is making higher lows. This type of divergence could indicate a potential upward reversal, as it suggests that the bearish momentum is losing strength. Traders may interpret this as a potential buying opportunity.
  2. 2.
    Regular Bearish Divergence: This occurs when the price of an asset is making higher highs, but the oscillator is making lower highs. This type of divergence could indicate a potential downward reversal, as it suggests that the bullish momentum is waning. Traders may interpret this as a potential selling opportunity.
It's important to note that while regular divergences can signal a potential reversal, they don't provide any information about when the reversal will occur. Therefore, they're often used in conjunction with other technical indicators or price patterns to confirm signals and improve the timing of trades.
Also, like all technical analysis tools, divergences are not always correct and can sometimes give false signals, so risk management strategies should always be used in trading.
What are hidden Divergences?
Hidden divergences, also known as continuation divergences, are patterns used in technical analysis to predict the continuation of a current trend. They occur when the price of an asset and a technical indicator move in opposite directions. They can be either bullish or bearish:
  1. 1.
    Hidden Bullish Divergence: This occurs when the price of an asset makes a higher low, but the oscillator (like RSI, MACD, or Stochastic) makes a lower low. This suggests that despite the pullback in price, the bullish momentum remains strong and the upward trend is likely to continue. Traders may interpret this as a potential buying opportunity.
  2. 2.
    Hidden Bearish Divergence: This occurs when the price of an asset makes a lower high, but the oscillator makes a higher high. This suggests that despite the upward correction in price, the bearish momentum remains strong and the downward trend is likely to continue. Traders may interpret this as a potential selling opportunity.
It's important to note that hidden divergences can be more difficult to spot than regular divergences and they require a clear trend to be present. Therefore, they're often used in conjunction with other technical indicators or price patterns to confirm signals and improve the timing of trades.
Also, like all technical analysis tools, divergences are not always correct and can sometimes give false signals, so risk management strategies should always be used in trading.
Moving Average Convergence Divergence (MACD)
MACD stands for Moving Average Convergence Divergence. It's a popular technical analysis tool that's used to identify potential buy and sell signals, and to spot potential price reversals.
The MACD is composed of two lines and a histogram:
  1. 1.
    The MACD Line: This is the faster line. It's calculated by subtracting the 26-day Exponential Moving Average (EMA) from the 12-day EMA.
  2. 2.
    The Signal Line: This is the slower line. It's a 9-day EMA of the MACD Line.
  3. 3.
    The Histogram: This is a visual representation of the difference between the MACD Line and the Signal Line.
Here's how you might use the MACD in trading:
  1. 1.
    Crossovers: When the MACD Line crosses above the Signal Line, it's considered a bullish signal and could be a good time to buy. When the MACD Line crosses below the Signal Line, it's considered a bearish signal and could be a good time to sell.
  2. 2.
    Divergences: If the price of an asset is making higher highs, but the MACD is making lower highs, this is considered a bearish divergence. It could be a sign that the upward trend is losing strength and a price reversal may be coming. Conversely, if the price is making lower lows, but the MACD is making higher lows, this is considered a bullish divergence. It could be a sign that the downward trend is losing strength and a price reversal may be coming.
  3. 3.
    Zero Line Crossovers: When the MACD Line crosses above the zero line, it's considered a bullish signal. When it crosses below the zero line, it's considered a bearish signal.
Remember, like all technical analysis tools, the MACD should be used in conjunction with other indicators and methods. It's also important to remember that while the MACD can provide valuable insights, it's not foolproof and can sometimes give false signals.
Histogram (Hist)
In the context of technical analysis and charting, "Hist" is often short for Histogram. A histogram is a graphical representation of the distribution of a dataset. It is an estimate of the probability distribution of a continuous variable.
In the context of the Moving Average Convergence Divergence (MACD) indicator, the histogram (often called the MACD Histogram) is used to visualize the difference between the MACD line and the Signal line. Each bar of the histogram represents the distance between the MACD line and the Signal line for that specific time period.
The MACD Histogram is used to spot changes in momentum:
  1. 1.
    Positive Values: When the MACD Line is above the Signal Line, the MACD Histogram will be above the zero line, indicating bullish momentum.
  2. 2.
    Negative Values: When the MACD Line is below the Signal Line, the MACD Histogram will be below the zero line, indicating bearish momentum.
  3. 3.
    Increasing/Decreasing Values: If the Histogram is getting larger, it indicates that the gap between the MACD and Signal lines is growing, suggesting that the current trend (either bullish or bearish) is getting stronger. If the Histogram is getting smaller, it suggests that the current trend is losing strength and could be about to reverse.
  4. 4.
    Histogram Crossovers: When the MACD Histogram crosses above the zero line, it could be a bullish signal. When it crosses below the zero line, it could be a bearish signal.
Just like any other technical indicator, the MACD Histogram should be used in combination with other technical analysis tools and indicators. It's also important to note that, like all indicators, the MACD Histogram can produce false signals and isn't 100% accurate.
Relative Strength Index (RSI)
RSI stands for Relative Strength Index. It's a momentum oscillator that measures the speed and change of price movements of an asset. The RSI was developed by J. Welles Wilder and introduced in his 1978 book, "New Concepts in Technical Trading Systems."
The RSI oscillates between zero and 100 and is typically used to identify overbought or oversold conditions in a market, divergence signals, and to identify the general trend.
Here's how you might use the RSI in trading:
  1. 1.
    Overbought and Oversold Conditions: If the RSI exceeds 70, the asset is usually considered overbought, suggesting that a price downturn could be coming. If the RSI falls below 30, the asset is usually considered oversold, suggesting that a price upturn could be coming.
  2. 2.
    Divergences: If the price makes a new high or low that isn't confirmed by the RSI, this divergence can signal a price reversal.
  3. 3.
    Trend Identification: Some traders use the 50 level to help identify trends. If the RSI is above 50, the trend is considered up, and if it's below 50, the trend is considered down.
  4. 4.
    Failure Swings: These are patterns that occur when the RSI goes into overbought or oversold territory, moves back towards the middle, and then reverses back to the previous extreme. These can also serve as early signals of potential price reversals.
Remember, like all technical analysis tools, the RSI should be used in conjunction with other indicators and methods. It's also important to remember that while the RSI can provide valuable insights, it's not foolproof and can sometimes give false signals.
Stochastic Oscillator (Stoch)
"Stoch" is short for Stochastic Oscillator, a momentum indicator that compares a particular closing price of an asset to a range of its prices over a certain period of time. The theory behind the indicator is that in an upward trending market, prices tend to close near their high, and during a downward trending market, prices close near their low.
The Stochastic Oscillator is presented as two lines. The main line is called "%K," and the second line, "%D," is a moving average of %K. The lines oscillate between 0 and 100.
Here's how you might use the Stochastic Oscillator in trading:
  1. 1.
    Overbought and Oversold Conditions: If the Stochastic Oscillator exceeds 80, the asset is usually considered overbought, suggesting that a price downturn could be coming. If it falls below 20, the asset is usually considered oversold, suggesting that a price upturn could be coming.
  2. 2.
    Crossovers: A buy signal is given when the %K line crosses up through the %D line, and a sell signal is given when it crosses down through the %D line.
  3. 3.
    Divergences: If the price makes a new high or low that isn't confirmed by the Stochastic Oscillator, this divergence can signal a price reversal.
  4. 4.
    Centerline Crossover: The level 50 centerline can be used as a way to gauge the market's momentum. If the Stochastic Oscillator is above 50, the momentum is considered up. If it's below 50, the momentum is considered down.
As with all technical analysis tools, the Stochastic Oscillator should be used in conjunction with other indicators and methods. It's also important to remember that while the Stochastic Oscillator can provide valuable insights, it's not foolproof and can sometimes give false signals.
Commodity Channel Index (CCI)
CCI stands for Commodity Channel Index. It's a versatile indicator that can be used to identify a new trend or warn of extreme conditions. Donald Lambert originally developed CCI to identify cyclical turns in commodities, but the indicator can be successfully applied to indices, ETFs, stocks, and other securities.
The CCI measures the difference between a security's price change and its average price change. High positive readings indicate that prices are well above their average, which is a show of strength. Low negative readings indicate that prices are well below their average, which is a show of weakness.
Here's how you might use the CCI in trading:
  1. 1.
    Overbought and Oversold Levels: The CCI is a momentum oscillator and can be used to identify overbought and oversold levels. A CCI reading above +100 may represent overbought conditions, and a reading below -100 may represent oversold conditions.
  2. 2.
    Divergences: If the price is making a new high or low but the CCI isn't, this divergence could signal a potential price reversal.
  3. 3.
    Trend Identification: The direction of the CCI can indicate the direction of the underlying trend. If the CCI is trending upwards, this suggests an uptrend in the price. Conversely, if the CCI is trending downwards, this suggests a downtrend in the price.
  4. 4.
    Zero Line Crossovers: The zero line is a crucial level of the CCI. When the CCI moves above zero, it indicates that the price is above its average relative to the defined period. Conversely, when the CCI moves below zero, it indicates that the price is below its average.
Remember, like all technical analysis tools, the CCI should be used in conjunction with other indicators and methods. It's also important to remember that while the CCI can provide valuable insights, it's not foolproof and can sometimes give false signals.
Momentum (MOM)
MOM is short for Momentum, a commonly used technical indicator in trading. The Momentum indicator compares the most recent closing price to a previous closing price (can be the closing price of any time period - day, week, month, etc.). It measures the rate of the rise or fall in price.
The calculation of the Momentum indicator is quite simple:
Momentum = Current Price - Price of N periods ago
The resulting value can be plotted around a zero line.
Here's how you might use the Momentum indicator in trading:
  1. 1.
    Crossovers: The zero line crossover can be a trading signal. If the Momentum indicator crosses above the zero line, it gives a bullish signal, which might suggest it's a good time to buy. If the indicator crosses below the zero line, it gives a bearish signal, which might suggest it's a good time to sell.
  2. 2.
    Divergences: If the price is making new highs/lows and the Momentum indicator fails to make new highs/lows, it creates a divergence. A divergence between the price and Momentum can signal a potential trend reversal.
  3. 3.
    Overbought and Oversold Levels: While the Momentum indicator isn't range-bound (like the RSI, for example), traders can still use extreme values to spot potential reversals. If the Momentum indicator reaches extremely high or low values (relative to its historical values), it might indicate the market is overbought or oversold.
Just like any other technical indicator, the Momentum indicator should be used in conjunction with other tools and indicators. While it can provide valuable insights, it's not foolproof and can sometimes give false signals.
On Balance Volume (OBV)
OBV stands for On Balance Volume, a technical analysis indicator that uses volume flow to predict changes in stock price. Joseph Granville first developed the OBV metric in the 1963 book "Granville's New Key to Stock Market Profits."
The idea behind the indicator is that volume often precedes price. The OBV shows crowd sentiment that can predict a bullish or bearish outcome.
The calculation of the OBV is relatively straightforward:
  • If the closing price is higher than the previous closing price, then: OBV = Previous OBV + Current Volume
  • If the closing price is lower than the previous closing price, then: OBV = Previous OBV - Current Volume
  • If the closing prices equals the previous closing price then: OBV = Previous OBV (the OBV doesn't change)
Here's how you might use the OBV in trading:
  1. 1.
    Trend Confirmation: A rising OBV reflects positive volume pressure that can lead to higher prices. Conversely, a falling OBV reflects negative volume pressure that can lead to lower prices.
  2. 2.
    Divergences: If prices are rising and the OBV is flat-lining or falling, the price may be nearing a top. If the price is falling and the OBV is flat-lining or rising, the price may be nearing a bottom.
  3. 3.
    Breakouts: Some traders believe that the OBV can foreshadow price breakouts. If the OBV is rising and breaks past its previous high (before the price does), this could be a bullish signal. Conversely, if the OBV is falling and breaks past its previous low, this could be a bearish signal.
Like all indicators, the OBV isn't foolproof and can sometimes give false signals. It should be used in conjunction with other technical analysis tools and methods.
Volume Weighted Moving Average Convergence Divergence (VWMACD)
VWMACD stands for Volume Weighted Moving Average Convergence Divergence. It's a variant of the traditional MACD indicator but uses the Volume Weighted Moving Average (VWMA) instead of the standard Simple Moving Average (SMA) or Exponential Moving Average (EMA).
The VWMACD indicator, like the regular MACD, consists of the MACD line, signal line, and histogram. However, in this case, the MACD line is calculated by subtracting the longer period VWMA from the shorter period VWMA, and the signal line is the EMA of the MACD line. The histogram represents the difference between the MACD line and the signal line.
Here's how you might use the VWMACD in trading:
  1. 1.
    Crossovers: If the VWMACD line crosses above the signal line, it's considered a bullish signal, which might suggest it's a good time to buy. Conversely, if the VWMACD line crosses below the signal line, it's considered a bearish signal, which might suggest it's a good time to sell.
  2. 2.
    Zero Line Crossovers: When the VWMACD line crosses above the zero line, it's considered a bullish signal. When it crosses below the zero line, it's considered a bearish signal.
  3. 3.
    Divergences: If the price of an asset is making new highs/lows, and the VWMACD fails to make new highs/lows, it creates a divergence. A divergence between the price and VWMACD can signal a potential trend reversal.
  4. 4.
    Histogram: The histogram can also provide signals. If the histogram is above the zero line and starts to decrease, the trend might be losing momentum. If it's below the zero line and starts to increase, the downtrend might be losing momentum.
As with all technical analysis tools, the VWMACD should be used in conjunction with other indicators and methods. It's also important to remember that while the VWMACD can provide valuable insights, it's not foolproof and can sometimes give false signals. As of my knowledge cutoff in September 2021, the VWMACD is not a standard or widely recognized indicator, and usage or recognition may vary among traders.
Chaikin Money Flow (CMF)
CMF stands for Chaikin Money Flow, a technical analysis indicator used to measure Money Flow Volume over a set period of time. Marc Chaikin developed the Chaikin Money Flow indicator to measure the accumulation/distribution of a security over a specified period.
The CMF is based on the observation that buying support is normally signaled by: increased volume and frequent closes in the top half (or above the midpoint) of the daily range.
Similarly, selling pressure is evidenced by: increased volume and frequent closes in the lower half (or below the midpoint) of the daily range.
The formula to calculate CMF is somewhat complex, but in essence, it multiplies the volume for each period by the corresponding period's "money flow volume" (which is based on the relative location of the close within the high/low range), and then sums these values over a specified period.
Here's how you might use the CMF in trading:
  1. 1.
    Trend Confirmation: A bullish trend is confirmed when the CMF is positive (above zero), indicating buying pressure. A bearish trend is confirmed when the CMF is negative (below zero), indicating selling pressure.
  2. 2.
    Divergences: If the price is making new highs/lows and the CMF isn't, this divergence can signal a potential trend reversal.
  3. 3.
    Overbought and Oversold Conditions: While the CMF isn't typically used to identify overbought or oversold conditions, extremely high or low levels could potentially be interpreted as overbought or oversold.
Remember, like all technical analysis tools, the CMF should be used in conjunction with other indicators and methods. It's also important to remember that while the CMF can provide valuable insights, it's not foolproof and can sometimes give false signals.
Money Flow Index (MFI)
MFI stands for Money Flow Index, a technical oscillator that uses price and volume data to identify overbought or oversold signals in an asset. It's also known as the volume-weighted RSI (Relative Strength Index) because it incorporates volume, unlike the RSI, which only considers price.
The MFI is calculated by accumulating positive and negative Money Flow values (the amount of trading during a period that closed higher, and the amount of trading during a period that closed lower), then creating a Money Ratio. The MFI is then calculated similarly to the RSI, incorporating the ratio of positive/negative money flow (Money Ratio).
The MFI oscillates between 0 and 100 and is typically used to identify overbought or oversold conditions:
  1. 1.
    Overbought and Oversold Conditions: If the MFI exceeds 80, the asset is usually considered overbought, suggesting that a price downturn could be coming. If the MFI falls below 20, the asset is usually considered oversold, suggesting that a price upturn could be coming.
  2. 2.
    Divergences: If the price makes a new high or low that isn't confirmed by the MFI, this divergence can signal a price reversal.
  3. 3.
    Trend Identification: Some traders use the 50 level to help identify trends. If the MFI is above 50, the trend is considered up, and if it's below 50, the trend is considered down.
  4. 4.
    Failure Swings: These are patterns that occur when the MFI goes into overbought or oversold territory, moves back towards the middle, and then reverses back to the previous extreme. These can also serve as early signals of potential price reversals.
Remember, like all technical analysis tools, the MFI should be used in conjunction with other indicators and methods. It's also important to remember that while the MFI can provide valuable insights, it's not foolproof and can sometimes give false signals.
Wolfpack (WOLF)
Wolfpack is a key indicator within the Triple Confirmation strategy. Essentially, it represents the histogram difference between an EMA 3 and EMA 8, processed through a Taylor Series. Think of Wolfpack as an evolution of the MACD, which is based on moving averages. Though it belongs to the momentum indicator family, Wolfpack distinguishes itself by not having a defined upper or lower boundary, unlike tools like the RSI or TSI. This unique attribute makes Wolfpack an excellent tool for spotting clear divergences. When paired with Volume, it offers a deep dive into understanding if a market move is genuine or merely a deceptive trap.

Volume

Volume plays a crucial role in the cryptocurrency trading landscape, offering traders insights into the strength and depth of market movements. Essentially, volume represents the number of coins or tokens traded within a given timeframe. A sudden surge in volume often correlates with significant price changes, indicating strong trader interest and activity. For instance, a price increase accompanied by rising volume can signal strong buying momentum, while an uptick in price with declining volume might suggest a lack of conviction and a potential reversal. Conversely, a falling price on high volume can denote strong selling pressure. By analyzing volume in conjunction with other indicators, traders can gain a deeper understanding of market sentiment, differentiating between genuine market movements and potential "fake outs" or traps. In the volatile crypto market, volume serves as a critical confirmation tool, helping traders validate the authenticity of price trends.

Market Structure

In cryptocurrency trading, understanding market structure is fundamental for deciphering the rhythmic ebbs and flows of price movements. At its core, market structure breaks down the chronological sequence of higher highs, higher lows, lower highs, and lower lows, serving as a map that indicates prevailing trends and potential trend reversals. Recognizing these patterns enables traders to predict whether the crypto market is in a bullish (uptrend) or bearish (downtrend) phase. Furthermore, the shifts between these structures, such as a transition from lower highs to higher highs, can signal significant turning points in the market. By grasping the nuances of market structure, traders can better position themselves, making informed decisions on entry, exit, and risk management. In the unpredictable world of crypto trading, a solid comprehension of market structure provides an essential anchor, allowing traders to navigate the tumultuous waters with greater confidence and foresight.

BBWP (Tradingview Indicator by The_Caretaker)

Bollinger Band Width Percentile is derived from the Bollinger Band Width indicator. It shows the percentage of bars over a specified lookback period that the Bollinger Band Width was less than the current Bollinger Band Width. Bollinger Band Width is derived from the Bollinger Bands® indicator. It quantitatively measures the width between the Upper and Lower Bands of the Bollinger Bands. Bollinger Bands® is a volatility-based indicator. It consists of three lines which are plotted in relation to a security's price. The Middle Line is typically a Simple Moving Average. The Upper and Lower Bands are typically 2 standard deviations above, and below the SMA (Middle Line). Volatility is a statistical measure of the dispersion of returns for a given security or market index, measured by the standard deviation of logarithmic returns. To learn more about the BBWP Indicator, click here.​

Triple Confirmation Signal:

COMING SOON
What is the Potato Signal?
COMING SOON
What is Wolfpack?
Wolfpack is a key indicator within the Triple Confirmation strategy. Essentially, it represents the histogram difference between an EMA 3 and EMA 8, processed through a Taylor Series. Think of Wolfpack as an evolution of the MACD, which is based on moving averages. Though it belongs to the momentum indicator family, Wolfpack distinguishes itself by not having a defined upper or lower boundary, unlike tools like the RSI or TSI. This unique attribute makes Wolfpack an excellent tool for spotting clear divergences. When paired with Volume, it offers a deep dive into understanding if a market move is genuine or merely a deceptive trap.
What is Market Liberator B?
COMING SOON
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